Supervisor Angius goes to Washington

Supervisor Hildy Angius took part in conferences in Washington, where she said she has made friends for Mohave County.

Photo by Hubble Ray Smith.

Supervisor Hildy Angius took part in conferences in Washington, where she said she has made friends for Mohave County.

KINGMAN – You can feel the major changes made by the Trump Administration in Washington, D.C., Supervisor Hildy Angius said Monday during her legislative report at Mohave County Board of Supervisors regular meeting.

Angius and board Chairman Gary Watson attended the National Association of Counties Legislative Conference, and both said it was an interesting and informative trip.

Keynote speakers included Transportation Secretary Elaine Cho, former VA Secretary David Shulkin, retired Gen. Stanley McChrystal and U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross.

“We found out that there is an exciting bipartisan program within the newly passed tax bill called opportunity zones,” Angius said. “Opportunity zones offer favorable capital gains treatment for taxpayers who invest in designated high poverty neighborhoods.”

Investors in real estate or businesses in a qualified zone who hold their property for 10 years can sell it free of capital gains tax, and also get a break on untaxed capital gains rolled into an opportunity zone investment, Angius explained.

Angius attended a session on Trump’s plan to invest more than $1 trillion in the nation’s infrastructure, promoting an 80-20 public-private partnership. The federal government will cover 20 percent of a project if the state or local jurisdiction can come up with 80 percent.

“That’s nice and fine if you live in a place that has that kind of money, but counties like us don’t,” the supervisor said. “President Trump thought of that too, so he has proposed a $50 billion carve-out that will be distributed to the states over a 10-year period.”

The most exciting part of the trip, Angius said, was an invitation to attend a 3½-hour meeting with the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs to discuss local issues with representatives from different government agencies.

“They said they understand the hard jobs we have and how the decisions they make in Washington affect us, and they wanted to do a better job of communication with us,” Angius said.

One of those representatives was from the U.S. Department of Interior, who could be Mohave County’s “new best friend,” she added.

Before leaving Washington, Angius visited some of Arizona’s congressional representatives, leaving water resolutions adopted by the Board of Supervisors with Sen. John McCain and Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke.