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6:11 AM Wed, Nov. 14th

Ducey, McSally take last shots during ‘Victory Tour’ stop in Kingman

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey appeals to Republican supporters to get out the vote for Tuesday’s general election during a ‘Victory Tour’ stop in Kingman Monday. (Photo by Hubble Ray Smith/Daily Miner)

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey appeals to Republican supporters to get out the vote for Tuesday’s general election during a ‘Victory Tour’ stop in Kingman Monday. (Photo by Hubble Ray Smith/Daily Miner)

KINGMAN – Gov. Doug Ducey and a busload of Republican candidates stopped at Black Bridge Brewery Monday afternoon for a late push to get out the Republican vote for Tuesday’s general election that political pundits see as critical to control Congress.

Republican candidates on a “Victory Tour” were greeted by more than 100 cheering supporters at the brewery’s outdoor stage, shaking hands with voters wearing candidate buttons and posing for photographs before taking the stage for a 30-minute rally.

“Are you ready for a smash-mouth victory Tuesday?” Ducey asked as the crowd roared. “Are you ready to keep Arizona red? Our party is united and you can feel the energy across the state.”

Ducey thanked Sen. Jon Kyl for “stepping up” in his appointment following the death of Sen. John McCain.

“Not only is he a patriot and conservative, we have Justice Brett Kavanaugh in the U.S. Supreme Court,” Ducey said.

“I’m counting on Mohave County. This is our great red Republican firewall,” the governor said. “It’s this county that can run the table for Republicans on that ticket.”

Martha McSally, in a tight race with Democrat Kyrsten Sinema to claim the Senate seat vacated by Jeff Flake, noted that Arizona has only had 11 U.S. senators in its history, and she would be the 12th.

She went after Sinema, a U.S. Representative since 2013, for her protests against sending military to Iraq after the 2001 terrorist attacks, and for being an activist in helping immigrants cross the border.

“Every time it really matters, she puts on her Nancy Pelosi jersey and votes the wrong way,” McSally said.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich took a shot at California billionaire Tom Steyer for pouring $4 million into advertisements attacking him. He wants to turn Arizona into “this Petri dish for Democrats,” Brnovich said.

“The stakes have never been higher in this country. All you have to do is look around the country,” he said.

Kimberly Yee, Arizona senate majority leader and former representative running for Arizona Treasurer, said Democrats are trying to overturn all the great work that’s been done in the Legislature.

Emphasizing that she’s a fiscal conservative, Yee lashed out at her Democratic opponent, Mark Manoil, who wants to use the state’s $15 billion portfolio to create a state-run community banking system.

A person who had his car and home repossessed shouldn’t be in charge of investing the state’s money, Yee said.

Frank Riggs, Republican candidate for Superintendent of Public Instruction, said his 32-year-old Democratic opponent wants to introduce socialism into the school system.

“It’s much easier to build strong children than to repair broken men,” he said.

Arizona GOP Chairman Jonathan Lyons reported that Republican volunteers knocked on 1 million doors and called 2 million people, noting that people are 25 times more likely to vote if they’ve been contacted personally.

“So if you know four or five friends who haven’t voted yet, call them,” Lyons said.