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1:05 PM Tue, Nov. 13th

Letter | The Unknown Veteran

(Adobe Images)

(Adobe Images)

On Oct. 15, 2018 my husband and I ventured out in the crispy mid-morning air with the intention of making a stop at Goodwill. I hoped to find a bread keeper for my countertop there because they are so hard to find in retail stores.

As we wandered around the store, we didn’t find a bread keeper, but an American Flag in a glassed triangular case caught my husband’s attention. I’m sure you know the kind of flag I’m talking about. They are the flags given to families after a military memorial service honoring a veteran or active service member. In the end, we returned home empty handed.

At home, we watched a movie in the living room with the gas fireplace warming us enough to set off the fire alarm … again and again … before my husband hinted he was getting hungry. I prepared his chicken sandwich with BBQ chips, followed by a root beer float and a nap. When he awoke after an hour of snoozing, he turned to me and mentioned that flag at the Goodwill.

Being a veteran himself, it bothered him, a lot, that someone would just toss that flag away like it was nothing. Then he made the “off the cuff” comment that he almost felt like going down to the Goodwill and buying that flag anyway. The flag had been on my mind, too, so I told him I thought it was a wonderful idea and volunteered to go get it for him.

You see, that flag represented some veteran’s service to our country. It represented some man or woman who had loved our country enough that they were willing to stand on the front lines between tyranny and freedom, between us and evil forces.

I brought the flag and its case home and cleaned up the case. Since we don’t know the person or the story behind it, we just labeled it “The Unknown Veteran.” This veteran has passed on, but we wanted him or her to know that we gratefully acknowledge their service to our country and their sacrifices, maybe even their ultimate sacrifice, and they will not be forgotten. Their flag will remain on display and in memorial in our home, along with both mine and my husband’s fathers’ flags.

We know not everyone feels like we do about our veterans and our flag. We even understand this was probably a part of some estate sale, or whoever had possession of it was not able to keep it, and we are grateful for the opportunity to do this for “The Unknown Veteran.”

We have since wondered many times what this veteran’s story is. That said, is there anyone out there in the Kingman area who might know who this flag belonged to or even their name, or their family’s name? Thank you, in advance, for any information you may be able to provide.

Darre Willson