Christmas Coloring Contest
The Kingman Daily Miner Logo
Trusted local news leader for Kingman, Arizona & Mohave County
10:48 AM Tue, Dec. 11th

Rezone near Slaughterhouse Canyon Road could pave way for subdivision

The Planning and Zoning Commission looks to City-provided maps and data to help in its decision regarding a rezoning of property off of Slaughterhouse Canyon Road. (Photo by Travis Rains/Daily Miner)

The Planning and Zoning Commission looks to City-provided maps and data to help in its decision regarding a rezoning of property off of Slaughterhouse Canyon Road. (Photo by Travis Rains/Daily Miner)

KINGMAN – Planning and Zoning commissioners unanimously approved the rezoning of a property off Slaughterhouse Canyon Road to allow for an approximate 47-home subdivision, but noted that there will be additional considerations before construction can begin.

The area in question is on the west side of south Slaughterhouse Canyon Road, south of Mission Boulevard. Granite Bluffs II, zoned R-1-10, lies to the west and Canyon Bluffs II, zoned R-1-6, is to the east. The property is currently zoned R-1-10, but applicant Kathy Tackett-Hicks of KTH Consulting has applied to rezone the property to R-1-6 to allow for a 47-lot subdivision.

City staff recommended approval of the rezone with a few provisions: that the area with an average cross slope of 15 percent or greater remains designated open space; that UniSource Energy Services is consulted about relocating an existing power line crossing the property; lot design must accommodate the Transwestern Pipeline Easement along the western property boundary; and that there is a vehicle non-access easement to prohibit driveway access for properties that abut Slaughterhouse Canyon Road.

However, at least one member of the community raised concerns about a potential subdivision in the area. He specifically cited a need for road improvements on Jackson Street, and a stoplight and crosswalk at Jackson Street and Hualapai Mountain Road to help accommodate school children in the area. He said that infrastructure is already needed, but an additional 47 homes would make those improvements a necessity.

“And I’m not the only one in my neighborhood who’s against this,” said the man who lives adjacent to the property up for rezone.

City staff, along with Tackett-Hicks, said traffic impacts resulting from the subdivision would be addressed by a traffic impact analysis. Rich Ruggles, City principal planner, said the addition of 47 homes to the area would yield an expected 447 vehicle trips per day. He added that Slaughterhouse Canyon Road, which functions as a “collector street,” can handle 1,000 trips per day. The addition of 447 trips would still keep the daily traffic total under 1,000 trips. However, a traffic impact analysis is still necessary.

“Knowing that there’s already an existing subdivision that more or less mirrors this proposed subdivision, I don’t see an issue here,” Commissioner Scott McCoy said. “I know Jackson can be improved, and Mission Boulevard more or less is improved, there’s more than one point of access to the property. I don’t see a downside to rezoning, so I would support this.”

The other commissioners agreed, but again noted the importance of road improvements and a traffic impact analysis. The matter still has to go to City Council for approval.