Thanksgiving Coloring Contest
The Kingman Daily Miner Logo
Trusted local news leader for Kingman, Arizona & Mohave County
4:33 PM Sat, Nov. 17th

Kingman budget: City dollars hit the road

Kingman wish list includes $144M for street projects

MICHAL KNOWLTON/Miner<BR>
This graph depicts the funding that would be required to fund all of the city’s proposed capital improvement projects through 2019.

MICHAL KNOWLTON/Miner<BR> This graph depicts the funding that would be required to fund all of the city’s proposed capital improvement projects through 2019.

KINGMAN - Street projects dominate the city's capital improvement plan for the next five years, with more than $144 million in projects on the drawing board.

The most expensive proposal is the Rancho Santa Fe Parkway interchange.

Phase one of the project, which would begin in 2017, if ultimately approved, would cost more than $37 million. The second phase would cost an estimated $12 million.

One of the least expensive is the $400,000 already set aside for the railroad quiet zone, something Mayor Janet Watson said would be a "milestone" for Kingman when work is finished, hopefully in time for the International Route 66 festival scheduled for early August.

The project itself won't be difficult to construct, said Public Works Director Rob Owen. The challenge will be getting railroad and other entities to agree to fast-track construction.

That construction, said Owen, is relatively simple. It calls for the contractor to make at-grade railroad crossings at Second, Fourth and Topeka streets safer for motorists and pedestrians.

When finished, trains will no longer have to sound their horns when they pass through the downtown area.

Here's a partial breakdown on what else is on the drawing board (note: the Council will not prioritize any projects until later this spring):

• The Airfield Railroad Crossing would provide a third railroad crossing and will replace the closed Louise Avenue crossing and provide an alternative to the Hualapai Mountain Road and Airway Avenue crossings.

The total cost estimate is $10.3 million and preliminary action would begin in 2016.

• Improve Airway Avenue between Prospector Road and Rancho Santa Fe Parkway. This project is part of the plan for an interchange at Rancho Santa Fe Parkway and Interstate 40.

The total cost estimate is $6.6 million and will meet an Arizona Department of Transportation requirement regarding arterial roads.

• The Canyon Road railroad crossing would connect Canyon Road from Mission Boulevard to Topeka Street and would provide an alternate access to downtown Kingman from Hualapai Mountain Road, relieving traffic at Hualapai Mountain Road and Andy Devine Avenue.

The total cost estimate is $3 million and the Corporation Commission has already approved the at-grade crossing.

• The Downtown Cityscape would enhance Beale Street between First and Fifth streets through the construction of curb extensions, landscaping and crosswalk improvements.

The total cost estimate is about $785,000 and the goal is to improve the downtown experience for shoppers and merchants. The city seeks a grant to help fund the project.

• The Airway and Eastern improvement project would include widening Eastern Avenue to three lanes between Pasadena and Kenwood and widen Kenwood to three lanes.

The total cost estimate is $2.9 million and would improve traffic conditions in the neighborhood.

• A plan designed to ease traffic on Stockton Hill Road is the North Glen Road project. The ultimate goal is to extend North Glen Road from Airway Avenue north to Gordon. Home Depot has contributed $35,000 to phase one, which would be the construction of the road between Morrow and Kino.

The total cost estimate is $1.8 million.

Other projects include Route 66 pedestrian projects between the Powerhouse Visitors Center and Locomotive Park at an estimated cost of roughly $294,000; widening Stockton Hill Road between Airway and Gordon at an estimated cost of $6 million; widening Stockton Hill Road between Detroit and Airway avenues at an estimated cost of $6.5 million; and the purchase of replacement equipment for Public Works.

The first item on the list is a $100,000 bucket truck that can reach new traffic lights on Stockton Hill Road, Gordon and Bank Street. The current truck does not reach far enough.

The alternative, said Owen, is for the city to hire "a 7-foot electrician."

Click for home delivery with comics, grocery deals, inserts, TV listings, coupons and more