Trusted local news leader for Kingman, Arizona & Mohave County
Wed, May 22

Diet Center's Tip of the Week | Which group are you part of?

The CDC reports that 30% of adults in the U.S. engaged in sufficient amounts of exercise and 40% did not exercise at all. This means many people have accepted being overweight and inactivity as the norm. (Photo by Jacob Postuma on Unsplash)

The CDC reports that 30% of adults in the U.S. engaged in sufficient amounts of exercise and 40% did not exercise at all. This means many people have accepted being overweight and inactivity as the norm. (Photo by Jacob Postuma on Unsplash)

Hi this is Eunice with Diet Center.

The health club industry took a survey of average Americans. They found that 74% of Americans feel just fine about their weight and aren’t worried about getting enough exercise. Statistics show that over 60% of Americans are overweight or obese.

The CDC reports that 30% of adults in the U.S. engaged in sufficient amounts of exercise and 40% did not exercise at all. This means many people have accepted being overweight and inactivity as the norm. Many feel satisfied with their health, when in fact they should be concerned. 

Research shows that overweight people have higher healthcare costs during their lifetime than those who aren’t overweight due to illnesses caused by excess weight. The survey discovered three main attitudes of non-exercisers.

Group 1 recognized the benefits of exercise but didn’t feel guilty about being sedentary. This group wished there was a “magic pill” that would give them the benefits without the effort.

Group 2 recognized the benefits, but just don’t stay motivated to commit to routine exercise. This group feels guilty when they aren’t active.

Group 3 feels regular exercise is unnecessary for their health. 

What if I’m a procrastinator?

Think about the times when you may have said to yourself, “I’ll follow the program correctly tomorrow.”  Or, “I’ll start exercising next week.”  Procrastination is a hard habit to break.

You may convince yourself that eating that cupcake or sitting around watching television all day will make you feel better than eating an apple or taking a walk. Ironically, you usually end up feeling guilty and disappointed in yourself for not following your diet and remaining sedentary. Maybe you know you’re procrastinating, but aren’t sure why you can’t get motivated to focus on your weight loss efforts. 

Examine the emotions that are triggered when you think about weight loss. Such emotions may include fear of a lifestyle change, anger because you perceive that you have no control over your weight, a perfectionist attitude that the program isn’t worth the effort if you can’t follow it without making mistakes, fear of failure, or fear of success that will cause people to have higher expectations of you. 

These emotions can be dealt with. They become a problem when you don’t pay attention to your feelings. Solutions involve focus and awareness. Try to talk about your feelings, write them down or record them. Discuss them with a support person, and/or check out past behavioral tips that address specific emotions. Becoming aware of and taking steps to resolve emotional issues can help you break the habit of procrastination so you can put your best effort into your weight-loss program.

Changing your attitude toward exercise and eating well so that you incorporate them in your lifestyle can positively and significantly impact your weight-loss efforts.

Thank you for reading Diet Center’s Tip of the Week. If you’re struggling with your weight, please call Diet Center at 928-753-5066 or stop by 1848 Hope Ave.

Contact

This Week's Circulars

To view money-saving ads

For as little as $3.49*