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Tue, Sept. 21

Arizona oven: Excessive heat warning issued

Residents will want to seek out the shade, or stay indoors during the day, this week as temperatures climb above 100 degrees. The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heath warning for Kingman for three days starting Tuesday, Aug. 20. (Daily Miner file photo)

Residents will want to seek out the shade, or stay indoors during the day, this week as temperatures climb above 100 degrees. The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heath warning for Kingman for three days starting Tuesday, Aug. 20. (Daily Miner file photo)

KINGMAN – The National Weather Service has issued yet another excessive heat warning for the Kingman area. Temperatures are expected to reach more than 100 degrees for three days in a row starting Tuesday, Aug. 20.

Monday, Aug. 19 will have a high near 100 degrees, but conditions do not warrant an excessive heat watch. That changes Tuesday with a forecast of 102 degrees. The excessive heat warning is in effect from 11 a.m. Tuesday until 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 22.

Wednesday, Aug. 21 is expected to be the hottest of the three days with a high of 104 degrees forecast. The heat will subside slightly Thursday, which has a forecast temperature of 102 degrees. Low temperatures for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights are expected to be in the mid-70s.

As of the morning of Sunday, Aug. 18, temperatures weren’t expected to reach more than 100 degrees after Thursday. They will, however, be in the high 90s.

Those aiming to get out of the house to garden, exercise or engage in another outdoor activity should do so in the early morning or evening when temperatures are not as dangerous.

Be sure to drink plenty of water and wear lightweight clothing. Do not leave young children or pets unattended in vehicles.

If experiencing heat exhaustion, which is characterized by nausea or vomiting, a fast but weak pulse, muscle cramps, and cold, pale and clammy skin, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends moving to a cooler place, sipping water and placing wet cloths on one’s body. If throwing up, or if symptoms worsen or linger longer than an hour, seek medical help.

A heat stroke has symptoms such as hot, red, dry or damp skin along with dizziness, confusion and a fast, strong pulse. A heat stroke is a medical emergency, and help should be sought.

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