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Tue, June 18

Raw Mohave honey for Mohave allergies

Ladies working at Natural Planet at 3787 Stockton Hill Road have it covered when it comes to allergies. In the background – Las Vegas and Phoenix allergy mixes. (Photo by Agata Popeda/Daily Miner)

Ladies working at Natural Planet at 3787 Stockton Hill Road have it covered when it comes to allergies. In the background – Las Vegas and Phoenix allergy mixes. (Photo by Agata Popeda/Daily Miner)

KINGMAN – At the peak of the allergy season, with pollen from tumbleweed, mulberry and desert flowers flying around, locals swear by local raw honey.

The biggest problem in the Kingman area is tumbleweeds. Just like pollen and dust from the blooming dessert, they travel great distances and attack lawn and yards.

It seems that the community is set on what’s the best method to treat allergies, confirmed ladies who work at Natural Planet at 3787 Stockton Hill Road. Their regulars with spring high desert allergies go straight to the shelf with raw honeys.

Natural Planet works with a local producer, Correy Phillips, owner of Beezerk Honey in Golden Valley. Some beekeepers go as far as to use one specific plant, but Phillips goes by color. Currently, the store is selling his fall, deep amber batch.

“A spoon every day,” said a Natural Planet employee who moved here three years ago from Southern California and discovered that when it comes to allergies, Mohave relies on Mohave honey.

It really works, everybody says, but the trick is to do it regularly, gradually developing immunity to local plants.

Again, honey must be raw and local. For example, if you live in Lake Havasu, 40 miles southwest from Kingman, the flowers are different so the honey will be different.

“It works like allergy shots,” said Joel Holmes from Fort Rock Farms in Lake Havasu who suffers from allergies himself. “There are small amounts of allergens which boost your immune system. This is exactly what bees are collecting for us, moving around sage, juniper, alfalfa and rye grass.”

Located half an hour southwest from Kingman, Fort Rock Farms sells not only honey, but also grass-fed beef, pastured poultry and eggs.

But Kristin Sokol, a staff clinician with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases told Mother Jones that honey contains very little pollen.

“Honey isn’t even made from pollen; it’s made from flowers’ nectar,” she said. “If any pollen ends up in your honey, it’s because it got stuck to a bee and was transferred by accident. Even that tiny amount is likely from flowers, not grass, trees or weeds, whose pollen is the main culprit of springtime sneezing.”

If raw, unfiltered Arizonian honey doesn’t seem convincing, anyone can try homeopathic medicine. There are local Las Vegas and Phoenix allergy mixes available – at Natural Planet and online.

Reducing outside activity on high pollen count days is an obvious recommendation. Showers before bed and weekly changes of bed sheets should also help.

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