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Mon, May 17

Update: Weather forecast has fire managers concerned as Flag Fire burns south of Kingman

This photo by the Bureau of Land Management shows the Flag Fire burning in the Hualapai Mountains.

This photo by the Bureau of Land Management shows the Flag Fire burning in the Hualapai Mountains.

KINGMAN – Dry and hot conditions are set to return to the Kingman area in the coming days after rain and snow fell on the Flag Fire in the Hualapai Mountains earlier this week. That change in the weather has fire managers “concerned that the fire activity and intensity is likely to return,” fire managers wrote in a news release.

The Southwest Area Incident Management Team No. 1, which took command of the fire the morning of Wednesday, April 28, wrote in a news release that precipitation diminished the immediate intensity of the fire on Tuesday, but that weather conditions are forecast to change in the coming days and not for the better.

“Fire managers remain concerned that the fire activity and intensity is likely to return,” the management team wrote in a news release. “A great deal of heat remains on the west and north side of the fire.”

Incident Commander Alan Sinclair reminded residents that the fire’s threat remains until all lines are secured. Five crews working with aircraft resources were working the fire line on Tuesday, April 27, with others working to protect structures.

“These actions involve reinforcing contingency lines adjacent to area neighborhoods and removing dead trees along the north and east perimeter to create defensible space,” the release continued. “The Pine Lake powerline has been re-energized to those structures.”

Fire managers and the Mohave County Sheriff’s Office continue to assess when evacuees can safely return to their homes. The Pine Lake community, Hualapai Mountain Park and the lodge were all evacuated Sunday afternoon. Atherton Acres and Pinion Pine communities remain on SET status for evacuations. That means they should start preparing for evacuations as evacuation orders are imminent for the area.

The Flag Fire started at approximately 2 p.m. Sunday, with the specific cause still under investigation. However, fire investigators have determined the fire was human caused, according to the Bureau of Land Management.

The Flag Fire as of 9 a.m. Wednesday had affected approximately 1,400 acres, according to the incident management team. It is burning in ponderosa pines at higher elevations, as well as brush and grass. According to InciWeb, mixed conifer is also fuel for the fire, which has zero percent containment, at higher elevations.

Information provided by Southwest Area Incident Management Team No. 1 and InciWeb

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